Teachers Service Commission has invited couples who want to work schools near each other to apply for the transfer. This comes days after TSC stroke a deal with teachers Unions on transfers under the new CBA.

Since after, the commission has vowed to reunite families which were separated by delocalization policy. This will a sigh o relief to teachers family who have been delocalized by Macharia’s commission since the exercise was rolled out three years ago.

In new CBA the teacher service commission has stated that it will transfer couples to schools near each other if they are teachers and it is subject to availability of vacancies.

The delocalised teachers will no longer suffer from long distance relationships. Delocalization of teachers will continue under the new CBA but will be done in away to avoid separating families, reads part of the CBA agreement on Transfer of teachers.

Other Agreements confined in the new CBA include offering to increase maternity and paternity leave days, and extended a promotions reprieve for teachers in hardship.

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TSC wants to increase maternity leave days to 120 from the present 90, and paternity leave to 21 days up from 14.

The commission has also offered to grant teachers a pre–adoptive leave of 45 days from the date of adoption.

The commission also tabled a consideration to transfer couples to schools near each other (if both are teachers) subject to availability of vacancies.

TSC did not factor in salary pay-rise for teachers. This has angered teachers who have termed the deal as a joke. They feel let down by their officials who have since signed a non-monetary Cba.

The unions which held day-long negotiations with the Teachers Service Commission signed the CBA despite having declined to do so during the first meeting held in June 29, for lack of monetary benefits.

KUPPET Secretary General Akello Misori said the unions had agreed to sign the CBA as it is, but promised members that a review on the basic pay would be undertaken after TSC is given a go ahead by the Salaries and Remuneration Commission.

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Misori said it was a difficult decision to make but said beside the contentious remuneration issue, there are other benefits contained in the agreement which teachers will be able to enjoy.

“We have committed to subscribe to the CBA but the issue of basic pay remains un addressed. We hope to meet with TSC in the near future and have a review in regards to what we had proposed when things improve,” stated Misori.

KUPPET was seeking 30 to 70 per cent increment on the basic pay.

Misori’s KNUT counterpart Collins Oyuu said despite the lack of remuneration component, teachers had other gains to benefit from the signed CBA.

“I wish to tell our teachers that hope is still there, I want to assure them that there is room to have basic pay reviewed when the economy improves,” said Oyuu.

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KUSNET Secretary General James Torome said they expect the Commission to invite them for a review within one year.

TSC CEO Nancy Macharia lauded the unions for accepting the offer, saying they had put the interest of learners and teachers first.

Macharia said the Commission was open for a review, after they are given a go ahead by the Salaries and Remuneration Commission.

The Salaries and Remuneration Commission imposed a 2 -year ban on salary hikes for employees in the public service.

“As you are aware, we acted on the SRC advisory, and with the prevailing economic situation in the country we gave teachers what was available, but there is room for review if things get better,” she said.

Benefits contained in the CBA include extension of maternity and paternity leave days, with maternity leave extended to 120 days from 90 days. Paternity leave will take 21 days up from 14 days.

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